<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=658263587654409&ev=PageView&noscript=1" /> 3 Habits of Highly-Converting Opt-in or Lead-Magnet Titles | Blog from Ashlyn Carter | Launch Expert & Copywriter for Creatives

I'M ASHLYN

I've been called the OG of copywriters for creatives, wink—I hook up women with words as a launch copywriter & brand strategist. Even while raking in more than 7-figures since I've been at it, I believe working from a place of rest (not hustle) IS possible—and I want the same for you.
 
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January 23, 2017

3 Habits of Highly-Converting Opt-in or Lead-Magnet Titles

Reading time: 4 min.

You’ve got some ideas rattling around in the back of your mind for WHAT you could give away for free. After all, you’re a smart cookie worth her marketing smarts.

So I don’t want you for a second to get hung up for a second on what goes on the title page of that guy.

‘Cause here’s the deal: titling your lead-magnet isn’t too terribly different from titling a blog post or another offer … it just needs to be on-brand and SIMPLE to understand. But I don’t want you to just have an average name …

I want your opt-in to be the one people remember in Facebook groups, because the name of your opt-in has stuck with them long after they used it for all it’s worth (and it really helped them!).

So I’ll make you a deal: you go out there and build a really great opt-in, and I’ll help you slap a title on it. Deal?

You’re on!


1. Add one word that demonstrates it’s quick to consume and easy-to-understand.

Your email opt-in’s title has uno goal, chica: that’d be to get the RIGHT people on your email list (not. everyone.). Don’t waste your digital copy breath with words outside of supporting that single action.
If it doesn’t drive them to download it by sounding like something they could ACTUALLY fit in their busy lives, welllllll … they’d probably just rather Netflix binge.

Copy Bank: Checklist, quick-win, snappy, snackable, quick-tips, cheatsheet, swipeable, straightforward, small shifts, surefire, proven, tried-and-true, done-for-you, tangible, clear, fast-start, or basically any number.*

*numbers get a bonus point becauses exact numbers in your headline give ya credibility (“22? I wonder why 22 … she must know her stuff (because 25 or 30 sounds duh, #basic.”)

Example: Almost all of Amy Porterfield’s opt-ins are called cheatsheets or have “quick/simple/easy” in the title.



2. Add in words or phrases that are niche-y.

I’ll shout out myself for a mistake here. One of my first opt-ins was a pack of 3 wallpaper downloads. I get an A for effort for starting an email list before I was ready … it really helped me.

But I get a D for specificity.

Why is that a problem? Well, ’cause then I just attracted any ol’ person, and when I started writing about my passion — copywriting for creatives thanks to 10 years in marketing and a calligraphy business — I realized “Free Desktop Wallpaper Bundle” appealed to everyone.

Now? I’m not afraid to attract and repel. I know that my Launch Copy Checklist only appeals to those that get the gist of what an online launch may look like. I know that my Wedding Addressing Etiquette Cheatsheet appeals to brides who care about etiquette … and old school paper formalities. Don’t try to succeed at presenting something to everyone, but title it something that appeals to your perfect dreamboat client or customer.

Copy Bank: 15 Questions to Ask Your Wedding Photographer, The Budding Artist’s Guide to Shopping at Dick Blick.

Example: Val Geisler’s Gmail School. She drilled down to ONE kind of email platform hacking method … instead of trying to help everyone that needed inbox control.


3. Make sure it sounds helpful.

Answer what’s in it for her — and if you can’t fit it in the title, put a subhead. This bit of copy likely hits on a pain point!

Copy Bank: To _____, So you can ____, that will make your ______, how to ____, to avoid ____, to save ____(time/money), to make you a ____ rockstar.

Example: Michael Hyatt tells me I can shave time off my week? Done!

 

Whew! Still need a little more help naming your opt-in (or even thinking of the name of it?)? I have a free guide for you right here!

 

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Freshly sharpened pencil bouquet ready, I'm here to make sure your words sell. I help women like you steward your story well, so you can work from a place of rest—not hustle.

free mentoring? yes, please

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