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August 24, 2016

10 Addressing “Don’t’s” for Your Wedding Invitations and Save the Dates

Reading time: 1 min.

Wedding invitation etiquette — I’m a stickler for it, but I come by it naturally: I’m a calligrapher and dwell in wedding invitation envelopes. I must confess: I can’t cram names anymore! Two adult names plus three children’s names PLUS an address were never supposed to go one envelope.

And it’s ok.

You didn’t know.

Wedding Addressing Calligraphy Tips Atlanta Calligrapher

Here’s a quick reference list for wedding addressing invitation rules — I hope it helps give some guidance!

1 | Don’t use nicknames.

C’mon, they got a rockin’ full name. This is their chance to shine! If you don’t know their full name, send that Facebook message … and there is always something called Google and voter registration database. I’m not saying, but I’m just saying.

Tweet: Find out how to address your wedding invitations here: http://ctt.ec/H0Lbt+ via @ashlynscarter (Click to Tweet!)

2 |  Don’t use initials.

Dunno the middle name? Drop the initial.

3 | Don’t abbreviate “Doctor” or “Lieutenant,” etc.

They worked hard for that title. Let’s give ’em the whole word.

4 | Abbreviating Sr., Jr., etc. is ok! But if spelling them out, have a comma before. For example, “William Frederick Carter, junior”

5 | Don’t abbreviate street names

It’s not St. — it’s a street. And yeah, Boulevard is a long word, but dangit if it doesn’t look beautiful in calligraphy!

6 | Don’t use numerals for numbers under 13 — write it out!

Example, “One Felder Avenue”

Get 8 wedding invitation addressing tips: http://ctt.ec/H0Lbt+ via @ashlynscarter (Click to Tweet!)

7 | Don’t abbreviate directions.

Example, “Henley Court Southeast”

8 | Don’t abbreviate the state

Example, “New Hampshire”

Bottom line? Don’t abbreviate anything on the fanciest invitation you’ll send — of all times, this is your chance to channel your inner Princess Di and send out that classy correspondence to full names and addresses.

Need a bit of help getting started with that wedding invitation list? Grab my free spreadsheet template here!

 

Freshly sharpened pencil bouquet ready, I'm here to make sure your words sell. I help women like you steward your story well, so you can work from a place of rest—not hustle.

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  1. Stacey says:

    I’m not sure if it’s just my computer but the "Grab my free spreadsheet template here" isn’t a working hyperlink 🙁

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